Stage 2 | Subject Outline | Version control

Aboriginal Studies Stage 2
Subject outline

Version 1.0
For teaching in 2021. Accredited in May 2016 for teaching at Stage 2 from 2018.

Stage 2 | Graphic Banner

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Subject description

Subject description

Aboriginal Studies is a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.

In Aboriginal Studies, students learn from and with Aboriginal peoples, communities, and other sources of Aboriginal voice. Learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities is integral to students developing and extending respectful ways of thinking, communicating, understanding, and acting. Through their learning in this subject, students draw on elements of history, sociology, politics, arts, and literature.

Students acknowledge and extend their understanding of the narratives and accomplishments as told by Aboriginal peoples, and reflect on the impact of past events on the present and the future. They develop respect for what narratives and accomplishments mean to different Aboriginal peoples and communities.

Students analyse the historical and contemporary experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and communities. They examine the intergenerational influence and impact of government policies, past and present, on the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal peoples and communities today. Students investigate experiences of ongoing resistance and survival, and learn about initiatives and accomplishments developed in response to these experiences.

Diversity is at the heart of learning in Aboriginal Studies. Students develop their understanding of the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ identities and experiences, including cultural, political, linguistic, and contextual diversity. They acknowledge and extend their understanding of the diversity and the historical, social, and political importance of Aboriginal cultural expressions, and learn from a wide range of cultural expressions including painting, music, performance, literature, and oral traditions.

Students engage in learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities to develop respect for and awareness of the diversity of the experiences of Aboriginal peoples and communities. They develop and extend their respect for and understanding of cultural protocols, and reflect on the diversity of cultures. They develop respectful ways of thinking, listening, communicating, and acting, and the skills that will enable them to take action to promote social justice.

In this subject, ‘Aboriginal peoples’ refers to all Indigenous peoples of Australia. 


Web Content Display (Global)

Capabilities

The capabilities connect student learning within and across subjects in a range of contexts.

The SACE identifies seven capabilities.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Capabilities | Literacy

Literacy

In this subject students extend and apply their literacy capability by, for example:

  • learning from Aboriginal voices in a range of sources including written text, media, film, radio and television programs, cultural organisations, art galleries, museums, and digital sources such as websites and social media
  • exploring Aboriginal language initiatives such as maintenance, reclamation, revitalisation, and renewal
  • communicating informed attitudes and ideas through persuasive written argument, interpretation, discussion, and/or social action
  • understanding narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples in oral, written, and/or audiovisual form
  • analysing sources and identifying concepts such as context, purpose, intent, relevance, inference, bias, and reliability
  • developing and extending respectful ways of communicating 
  • appropriately acknowledging interactions, collaboration, and learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Capabilities | Numeracy

Numeracy

In this subject students extend and apply their numeracy capability by, for example:

  • developing spatial awareness through the use of maps representing Aboriginal language groups 
  • sequencing events and creating timelines
  • interpreting and analysing data from a variety of sources
  • appreciating symbolism in cultural expressions such as paintings.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Capabilities | ICT capability

Information and communication technology (ICT) capability

In this subject students extend and apply their ICT capability by, for example:

  • researching and accessing information using a variety of technologies 
  • learning from Aboriginal voices through digital, audiovisual, and multimedia sources
  • accessing Aboriginal voices beyond the local geographical area
  • collecting, representing, and analysing primary and secondary data electronically
  • collaborating in a digital environment; for example, using social media
  • creatively presenting findings using multimodal formats. 

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Capabilities | Critical and creative thinking

Critical and creative thinking

In this subject students extend and apply their critical and creative thinking capability by, for example:

  • deconstructing and analysing the historical, political, social, and economic influence and impact of government policies on geographical locations and languages
  • investigating and analysing experiences of ongoing resistance and survival
  • deconstructing and analysing the influence and impact of historical events on Aboriginal peoples and communities
  • deconstructing and analysing experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities
  • synthesising learning from Aboriginal peoples, communities, and other sources of Aboriginal voice.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Capabilities | Personal and social capability

Personal and social capability 

In this subject students extend and apply their personal and social capability by, for example:

  • reflecting on learning from and with Aboriginal peoples, communities, and other sources of Aboriginal voice
  • developing and extending respect for and awareness of the diversity of the experiences of Aboriginal peoples and communities
  • gaining confidence and developing respectful ways of thinking, communicating, and acting
  • developing the skills that will enable them to take action to promote social justice
  • evaluating and reflecting on learning about equality and social justice
  • working effectively with others and respecting the opinions of others
  • evaluating personal growth in confidence, respect, and responsibility, and progression in learning
  • demonstrating collaboration and initiative
  • being receptive to changes in thinking based on learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Capabilities | Ethical understanding

Ethical understanding

In this subject students extend and apply their ethical understanding capability by, for example:

  • acknowledging and respecting the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ viewpoints
  • following cultural protocols by appropriately acknowledging collaboration and learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities
  • respecting the diversity of the experiences of Aboriginal peoples and communities
  • acknowledging the contribution of Aboriginal peoples and communities to student learning and sharing this contribution with participating Aboriginal peoples and communities
  • understanding the concepts of social justice and reconciliation
  • respecting narratives as told by Aboriginal people, past and present.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Capabilities | Intercultural understanding

Intercultural understanding

In this subject students extend and apply their intercultural understanding capability by, for example:

  • developing and extending understanding of the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ identities and experiences
  • exploring Aboriginal peoples’ ongoing resistance and survival to understand the impact on diversity, identities, and achievements
  • appreciating and understanding the diversity and importance of Aboriginal cultural expressions, including language, literature, painting, music, performance, and oral traditions
  • communicating the significance of Aboriginal cultural expressions
  • respecting and understanding cultural protocols including intellectual and cultural property rights
  • establishing informed attitudes about how the past influences the present and the future
  • acknowledging and applying understanding of narratives and accomplishments as told by Aboriginal peoples
  • participating in a range of community activities such as festivals and events.

Web Content Display (Global)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge, cultures, and perspectives

In partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and schools and school sectors, the SACE Board of South Australia supports the development of high-quality learning and assessment design that respects the diverse knowledge, cultures, and perspectives of Indigenous Australians.

The SACE Board encourages teachers to include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge and perspectives in the design, delivery, and assessment of teaching and learning programs by:

  • providing opportunities in SACE subjects for students to learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures, and contemporary experiences
  • recognising and respecting the significant contribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to Australian society
  • drawing students’ attention to the value of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge and perspectives from the past and the present
  • promoting the use of culturally appropriate protocols when engaging with and learning from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities.  

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Learning requirements

Learning requirements

The learning requirements summarise the knowledge, skills, and understanding that students are expected to develop and demonstrate through their learning in Stage 2 Aboriginal Studies.

In this subject, students are expected to:

  1. synthesise learning from and with Aboriginal peoples, communities, and other sources of Aboriginal voice
  2. apply knowledge and understanding of narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples
  3. deconstruct and analyse how the past influences the present and the future
  4. deconstruct and analyse experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities
  5. evaluate and reflect on own learning
  6. work collaboratively to plan and implement informed social action. 

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Content

Content

Learning from and with Aboriginal peoples, communities, and other sources of Aboriginal voice underpins the learning in this subject. It enables students to access a range of Aboriginal viewpoints and narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples.

Through personal contact with Aboriginal peoples and communities, and from Aboriginal voices in a range of different sources, students develop an understanding of the influence and impact of past events, identities, knowledges, cultural expressions, and contemporary experiences. They develop and demonstrate their understanding of resistance, survival, and identity since invasion. Students apply their knowledge to show their understanding of how the past impacts on the present and the future, including the intergenerational impact of government policies on history and culture, economic, social, and political spheres and the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal peoples and communities.

Through learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities and deconstructing past experiences, students develop and apply their understanding of the diversity of communities, and how past influences and impacts affect individual perspectives on diversity, identity, cultural expressions, and contemporary experiences. They develop and deepen their respect, empathy, and insight into experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples. Students develop and extend respectful ways of thinking, responding, and acting, and the skills that will enable them to take action in support of social justice.

Students demonstrate their learning through social action within the school and/or local community, and develop and extend respectful ways of thinking, communicating, and acting. They follow cultural protocols by acknowledging their interactions and collaboration with Aboriginal peoples and communities. 

Stage 2 Aboriginal Studies is a 20-credit subject.

Aboriginal Studies is underpinned by three integrated learning strands that are studied through three contexts. The learning strands provide the conceptual framework for the knowledge, understandings, skills, and capabilities that students develop through each of the three contexts. The three learning strands are developed and extended in each of the three contexts, as illustrated in the diagram below.

 

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Content | Learning strands

Learning strands

  • Learning strand 1: Learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities
  • Learning strand 2: Narratives
  • Learning strand 3: Respect and responsibility

Learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities

Aboriginal voices are integral to the learning that students undertake in this subject. Students learn from and with Aboriginal people, including individuals, communities, and/or community organisations. Through their learning, students extend their understanding of the diversity in past events and experiences, cultures, and identities. They deconstruct and analyse the experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and communities.

Other opportunities for learning from Aboriginal voices may be accessed through a range of different sources including art galleries, museums, cultural organisations, radio and television programs, film, media, written text, digital sources such as websites and social media, and community activities such as festivals and events.

Students deconstruct and analyse the influence and impact of past events within each of the contexts studied. They understand the intergenerational impact of government policies on economic, social, and political spheres, and on the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal peoples and communities. Students develop and extend their understanding of and respect for the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ experiences of and viewpoints on significant events.

Narratives

Students develop and apply their understanding of and respect for Aboriginal narratives and accomplishments and what these mean to different Aboriginal peoples, past and present.

Acknowledging and understanding Aboriginal narratives enables students to deconstruct past and present experiences, and to consider and reflect on how these experiences may influence the present and the future. This deconstruction enables students to develop an understanding and respect for how these experiences influence and impact current and future generations. 

Students deconstruct Aboriginal narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples in oral, written, and/or audiovisual form, including songs, paintings, and performances.

Respect and responsibility

Students develop respect for and awareness of the diversity of the experiences of Aboriginal peoples and communities. They gain confidence, and develop and extend respectful ways of thinking, listening, communicating, understanding, and acting through their learning in this subject. Students develop skills that enable them to take action to promote equality and social justice.

Students follow cultural protocols by appropriately acknowledging their interactions and collaboration with Aboriginal peoples and communities, and respecting intellectual and cultural property rights.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Content | Contexts

Contexts

The learning strands provide the conceptual framework for the knowledge, understandings, skills, and capabilities that students develop through the following contexts:

  • Context 1: Diversity and identities
  • Context 2: Cultural expressions
  • Context 3: Contemporary experiences.

Students undertake learning in each of the three contexts. The contexts are not designed to be taught independently or to be of equivalent length. They should be sequenced and structured to suit individual cohorts of students and schools.

Diversity and identities

Students learn from and with Aboriginal individuals, communities, and/or community organisations to develop their understanding of the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ identities and experiences.

This may include deconstructing and analysing the historical, political, social, and economic influences and impacts of government policies on Aboriginal peoples and communities, while acknowledging the effects on past, present, and future generations.
Aboriginal peoples’ ongoing resistance and survival is explored to develop students’ understanding of the influence and impact on diversity and identities, while acknowledging accomplishments, past and present.

Cultural expressions

Through their learning from and with Aboriginal peoples, students develop and extend their understanding of the diversity and importance of Aboriginal cultural expressions. Students explore their understanding of the historical, political, and/or social importance of these expressions and are able to communicate the significance of these representations.

Students may learn from a wide range of cultural expressions, including language, literature, painting, music, performance, and oral traditions. Students develop respect for and understanding of cultural protocols, including intellectual and cultural property rights.

Contemporary experiences

Students investigate, analyse, and acknowledge contemporary experiences as told by Aboriginal peoples.

Through their learning from Aboriginal peoples and communities, and from Aboriginal voices in a range of different sources, students investigate and analyse experiences of ongoing resistance, resilience, and survival. Students develop informed attitudes towards and an understanding of how the past influences the present and the future.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Content | Protocols for teaching and learning

Protocols for teaching and learning

Protocols for teaching and learning in this subject include, but are not restricted to:

  • acknowledging and respecting the intellectual and cultural property rights of Aboriginal peoples and communities
  • learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities
  • acknowledging the contribution of Aboriginal peoples and/or communities to student learning and sharing this contribution with participating Aboriginal peoples and/or communities
  • where appropriate, providing opportunities for students to link traditional knowledge with contemporary contexts
  • accessing local resources and embedding these in the learning
  • accessing Aboriginal authored and produced materials; for example, documentaries, films, and books produced by Aboriginal peoples
  • collaborating with a site Aboriginal education team
  • creating opportunities for communicating, reinforcing, and celebrating student learning through informed social action.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Evidence of learning

Evidence of learning

All Stage 2 subjects have a school assessment component and an external assessment component.

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in Stage 2 Aboriginal Studies.

School assessment (70%)

  • Assessment Type 1: Learning Journey (40%)
  • Assessment Type 2: Social Action (30%)

External assessment (30%)

  • Assessment Type 3: Acknowledgment (30%).

Students provide evidence of their learning through five assessments, including the external assessment component. Students complete:

  • three responses in the learning journey
  • one social action
  • one acknowledgment.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | assessment-design-criteria

Assessment design criteria

The assessment design criteria are based on the learning requirements and are used by:

  • teachers to clarify for students what they need to learn
  • teachers and assessors to design opportunities for students to provide evidence of their learning at the highest possible level of achievement.

The assessment design criteria consist of specific features that:

  • students should demonstrate in their learning
  • teachers and assessors look for as evidence that students have met the learning requirements.

For this subject the assessment design criteria are:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • deconstruction, analysis, and synthesis
  • evaluation, collaboration, and reflection.

The specific features of these criteria are described below.

The set of assessments, as a whole, must give students opportunities to demonstrate each of the specific features by the completion of study of the subject.

Knowledge and Understanding 

The specific features are as follows:

KU1 Knowledge and understanding of narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples.
KU2 Contextual application of knowledge and understanding of narratives.

Deconstruction, Analysis, and Synthesis 

The specific features are as follows:

DAS1 Deconstruction and analysis of how the past influences the present and the future.
DAS2 Deconstruction and analysis of experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.
DAS3 Synthesis of learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Evaluation, Collaboration, and Reflection 

The specific features are as follows:

ECR1 Evaluation of and reflection on own learning.
ECR2 Collaboration in planning and implementing a social action. 

Stage 2 | Subject outline | School assessment

School assessment

The school assessment component  for Stage 2 Aboriginal Studies consists of two assessment types:

  • Assessment Type 1: Learning Journey
  • Assessment Type 2: Social Action.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | School assessment | Assessment Type 1: Learning Journey

Assessment Type 1: Learning Journey (40%)

Students complete three responses as part of their learning journey.

In the set of three responses, students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal narratives and synthesise their learning from Aboriginal peoples, communities, and/or other sources of Aboriginal voice. They evaluate and reflect on their learning, and consider how their thinking in the subject has changed. They complete one response based on each of the contexts:

  • diversity and identities
  • cultural expressions
  • contemporary experiences.

Students’ evidence for their learning journey may include, but is not restricted to:

  • responses to texts such as literature, art, film, music, performance, and oral traditions
  • a movie clip
  • a webpage
  • a blog or vlog
  • an avatar presentation
  • a multimedia presentation
  • a music video.

The learning journey may be presented in multimodal, oral, or written form. As a set, the learning journey responses should be a maximum of 15 minutes if oral, 2400 words if written, or the equivalent if multimodal.

For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • deconstruction, analysis, and synthesis
  • evaluation, collaboration, and reflection.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | School assessment | Assessment Type 2: Social Action

Assessment Type 2: Social Action (30%)

Students apply their knowledge and understanding from their learning from and with Aboriginal peoples, communities, and/or other sources of Aboriginal voice to undertake one social action. They deconstruct and analyse:

  • how the past continues to influence the present and the future, and/or
  • experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

This enables students’ to collaboratively plan and implement a social action that communicates their learning and aims to deepen their own understanding and the understanding of the school or local community.

Students may work in a school or community-based group, or any other appropriate collaboration. The group may collaborate face-to-face or in a digital environment, including social media platforms.

The social action may include, for example:

  • organise and contribute to a cultural tourism site visit
  • develop a timeline of Aboriginal histories to display in a public place
  • work with younger students to develop their knowledge of Aboriginal cultures
  • visit Aboriginal communities and/or organisations and present learning from the visit
  • present an exhibition of learning that celebrates Aboriginal narratives and/or issues that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities
  • create a hall of fame featuring Aboriginal role models and their accomplishments
  • curate an expo showcasing Aboriginal enterprises and entrepreneurship
  • create an online tool or digital education pack
  • organise a school assembly or performance
  • promote and contribute to community organisations
  • write letters or emails, or make phone calls in response to an issue that is of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities
  • research oral narratives and create a product
  • research and design an outdoor space using local knowledge
  • contribute to staff development through a presentation.

Each student presents individual evidence of their:

  • deconstruction and analysis of 
    • how the past continues to influence the present and future
      and/or
    • experiences of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities 
  • evaluation and reflection on their own learning from the social action, including evidence of their contribution to planning and collaboration. Students may make reference to self-assessment and/or oral or written responses to a survey in order to evaluate the changes in their own thinking
  • social action such as photographs and movie clips integrated in the deconstruction and evaluation sections.

The deconstruction and analysis, and the evaluation of and reflection on the social action may be presented in multimodal, oral, or written form. It should be a maximum of 9 minutes if oral, 1500 words if written, or the equivalent if multimodal.

For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • deconstruction, analysis, and synthesis
  • evaluation, collaboration, and reflection.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | External assessment

External assessment

The external assessment component for Stage 2 Aboriginal Studies consists of an acknowledgment.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | External assessment | Assessment Type 3: Acknowledgement

Assessment Type 3: Acknowledgement (30%)

Students undertake one acknowledgment task. In the acknowledgment students demonstrate their understanding of narratives and accomplishments as told by Aboriginal peoples. They present evidence of Aboriginal peoples’ and communities’ viewpoints on a selected area of study from one of the contexts:

  • diversity and identities
  • cultural expressions
  • contemporary experiences.

They follow cultural protocols by acknowledging their interactions, collaboration, and learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities.

Within the context selected, students:

  • demonstrate and apply their knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal narratives and accomplishments learned from and with Aboriginal peoples and/or communities
  • deconstruct and analyse how the past influences the present and future in their selected context
  • synthesise their learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Examples of areas of study may include:

  • diversity and identities
    • resistance over time
    • organisations that support communities, promote reconciliation, and educate; for example, Link-Up
  • cultural expressions
    • Bangarra and acknowledgment of their world impact
    • anthology of music lyrics or poems that tell a story over time
    • the importance of cultural festivals such as Garma
  • contemporary experiences
    • family history for Aboriginal students
    • cultural maintenance and ways in which families stay connected
    • community voices on contemporary experiences, such as treaty, the ‘Change the Date’ campaign, tourism, and the arts.

The acknowledgment may be in presented in multimodal, oral, or written form. It should be a maximum of 12 minutes if oral, 2000 words if written, or the equivalent if multimodal.

The following specific features of the assessment design criteria for this subject are assessed in Assessment Type 3: Acknowledgment:

  • knowledge and understanding — KU1, KU2
  • deconstruction, analysis, and synthesis — DAS1, DAS3.

Web Content Display (Global)

Performance standards

The performance standards describe five levels of achievement, A to E. 

Each level of achievement describes the knowledge, skills, and understanding that teachers and assessors refer to in deciding how well students have demonstrated their learning on the basis of the evidence provided. 

During the teaching and learning program the teacher gives students feedback on their learning, with reference to the performance standards.

At the student’s completion of study of each school assessment type, the teacher makes a decision about the quality of the student’s learning by:

  • referring to the performance standards
  • assigning a grade between A+ and E– for the assessment type.  

The student’s school assessment and external assessment are combined for a final result, which is reported as a grade between A+ and E–.

Stage 2 | Subject outline | Performance standards

Performance standards

Stage 2 performance standards for Aboriginal Studies can be viewed below. You can also download in Word format [DOC 45KB].

To learn more about what performance standards are, how they are used, and other general information, see performance standards and grades

  Knowledge and Understanding Deconstruction, Analysis, and Synthesis Evaluation, Collaboration, and Reflection
A

Perceptive and well-informed knowledge and understanding of narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples.

Insightful contextual application of knowledge and understanding of narratives.

Perceptive deconstruction and analysis of how the past influences the present and the future.

Perceptive deconstruction and analysis of experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Discerning synthesis of learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.
Insightful evaluation of and reflection on own learning.

Proactive collaboration in planning and implementing a social action.
B

Well-informed knowledge and understanding of narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples.

Some insightfulness in contextual application of knowledge and understanding of narratives.

Some perceptiveness in deconstruction and analysis of how the past influences the present and the future.

Some perceptiveness in deconstruction and analysis of experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Synthesis of learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Well-considered evaluation of and reflection on own learning.

Active collaboration in planning and implementing a social action.

C

Informed knowledge and understanding of narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples.

Generally insightful contextual application of knowledge and understanding of narratives.

Generally competent deconstruction and some analysis of how the past influences the present and the future.

Generally competent deconstruction and some analysis of experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Integration and description of learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Competent evaluation and reflection on own learning.

Generally active collaboration in planning and implementing a social action.

D

Basic knowledge and some understanding of narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples.

Some basic application of knowledge and understanding of narratives.

Basic description of how the past influences the present and the future.

Basic description of experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Some description of learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Basic description of and some reflection on own learning.

Some collaboration in planning and implementing a social action.

E

Emerging awareness of narratives as told by Aboriginal peoples.

Attempted application of knowledge and understanding of narratives.

Attempted description of how the past influences the present and the future.

Attempted description of experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Attempted description of learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and/or communities.

Attempted description of own learning.

Attempted collaboration in planning and implementing a social action.


Stage 2 | Subject outline | Subject changes

Subject changes

Any changes to this subject will be recorded here.