Web Content Display (Global)

Consultation feedback

Summary

Feedback was received from teachers, schools, higher education and training institutions, and community members, as well as the subject reference groups, and subcommittees of the SACE Board. This feedback was critical in shaping the subjects for accreditation.

A summary of the key consultation feedback and amendments to the draft subject outlines is provided for each subject.

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Stage 1 and Stage 2 Sciences

Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Environmental Science, and Physics

Key changes to the Board-accredited draft subject outline include:

  • Some of the feedback on the science subjectshighlighted two areas for further refinement: to make the content organisation clearer in the documents - in particular that teachers can select aspects of the Stage 1 topics that suit the needs and interests of their cohorts; and to critically evaluate all the content to identify what could be removed without compromising the integrity of the learning. Overall, there has been a reduction in content in the science subject outlines when compared to the current subjects and expectations of coverage. This will be further refined when preparing exemplar programs and learning and assessment plans for the Stage 1 and Stage 2 implementation workshops.
  • Feedback indicated that the structure of the content showing the key concepts of 'intended student learning', and 'possible strategies, contexts, and activities', was not clear; and some teachers were concerned that the examples provided in theright-hand columns all had to be covered. In fact, these are only suggestions, for guidance.The 'possible strategies, contexts, and approaches' column has beenreplaced with 'possible contexts' to avoid confusion, and the introductory sections to the structure rewritten to provide more clarity. The purpose of the 'possible contexts' will be exemplified at forthcoming implementation workshops with a broad range of exemplars.
  • Further reductions were made to the concepts and contexts, and clearer connections to the capabilities highlighted in the topic introductions, developing further examples of science innovations and links to science as a human endeavour in the 'possible contexts' in the content.
  • Feedback on the sciences also requested consideration of opportunities for interdisciplinary approaches to learning. This will be addressed through the preparation of program exemplars; for example, how to integrate 10 credits of Biology and 10 credits of Chemistry at Stage 1 into an interdisciplinary program delivered over a semester. Thematic approaches (e.g. wine chemistry; agricultural chemistry) and programs that do not follow a linear sequence through a subject outline will also be exemplified. The learning requirements are also consistent across all four subjects, which supports opportunities for interdisciplinary approaches to teaching and learning.
  • The capabilities are common across all four science subjects, and are addressed explicitly throughout the subject outlines, through the interweaving of the strands of Science as a Human Endeavour, Science Inquiry Skills, and Science Understanding. Examples of how the capabilities can be developed through the study of these subjects are embedded throughout Stage 1 and Stage 2, and have been highlighted in the topic introductions. Amendments in response to feedbackinclude more examples of critical and scientific thinking, such as posing and deconstructing problems, and of the different dimensions of ethical understanding, including the ethical use of data and the ethical implications of scientific work.
  • The learning in each subject outline, and in the 'possible contexts',is expressed as 'action' word descriptions to engage students in applying their understanding and skills to think innovatively about solutions to problems and challenges. This was strengthened following consultation. The variety of contexts provide opportunities for students to see links between science understanding, the outside world, and human activity. Students' expertise is developed by multiple interconnections among concepts.
  • References to the Australian Curriculum are not overt, but are evident throughout the subject outlines. The historical perspectives from the Australian Curriculum are presented in context, with a forward-looking approach, and focus on the ideas and their impact rather than on individuals. Some Australian Curriculum concepts have not been included in the subject outlines because they do not link to the other concepts or contexts.
  • Stage 1 exemplars are being developed to provide guidance on selecting aspects of the topics to maximise flexibility in programming, and that highlight those aspects of the curriculum that are innovative and herald changes in learning and assessment practices, such as designing complex, non-routine tasks.
  • The section on 'big ideas and their applications' and the numbered icons in the draft Physics subject outline will be intergrated into support materials. This is the approach being taken with the overarching themes in Biology.
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Stage 1 and Stage 2 Ancient Studies

Feedback on Ancient Studies focused on suggestions about refinement of specific details. Following consultation, the subject was reviewed to ensure that the capabilities were evident, particularly in the topic introductions and inquiry skills, and to emphasise opportunities for innovation.

Key changes to the Board-accredited draft subject outline include:

  • The inclusion of 'North Africa in the table of ancient or classical societies or cultures that may be studied. 'Carthage, Egypt (c.1500-500 BCE), and Persia, and Greco-Roman Egypt' (c. 500 BCE-CE 500) have also been added to broaden options.
  • The weighting for Assessment Type 1: Skills and Applications at Stage 2 has been increased to 50% to reflect the range of evidence of student learning in the assessment type. The requirement for one skills and applications task to be in a written format has been included, along with clarification of supervised tasks.
  • The title of Assessment Type 2: Analysis and Connections in the consultation version has been amended to 'Connections', to focus on research and understanding, and on making connections and comparisons. The weighting has been reduced to 20%, and the options for study reworded to broaden the options for study.
  • Specifications for the external inquiry have been reworded for clarity.

Exemplars are being developed for inclusion in implementation workshops and web publication that highlight in particular those aspects of the curriculum that are innovative and herald changes in learning and assessment practices. These will include, for example, the new 'Connections' tasks.

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Stage 1 and Stage 2 Modern History

Feedback on Modern History focused on suggestions about refinement of specific details. Following consultation, the subject was also reviewed to ensure that the capabilities were evident, particularly in the topic introductions and inquiry skills, and to emphasise opportunities for innovation.

Key changes to the Board-accredited draft subject outline include:

  • There are more references to the role of women in history.
  • Cultural history has been included in several topics.
  • More emphasis has been placed on actual student activity involved in the dynamics of practising the historian's craft in the 'Personal and social capability'.
  • There was concern at the lack of 'Communication' from the assessment design criteria as this is a valued skill in the discipline of History. This has now been strengthened within the specific features forApplication and Evaluation.
  • The Skills of Historical Inquiry list has been rearranged to better reflect the typical inquiry process. Students write one essay in the external examination, not two as is currently required.

Exemplars are being developed for inclusion in implementation workshops and web publication that highlight in particular those aspects of the curriculum that are innovative and herald changes in learning and assessment practices. These will include, for example, how the Historical Study (in the current SACE subject, a written essay) can be presented successfully in multimodal form.

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Stage 1 and Stage 2 Geography

Feedback on Geography focused on suggestions about refinement of specific details. Following consultation, the subject was reviewed to ensure that the capabilities were evident, particularly in the topic introductions and inquiry skills, and to emphasise opportunities for innovation.

Key changes to the Board-accredited draft subject outline include:

  • The inclusion of all seven geographical concepts to the learning requirements.
  • Some of the examples for Assessment Type 2: Fieldwork in the consultation draft were seen as quite broad; these have been replaced with more defined and achievable suggestions.
  • An introductory paragraph has been added to 'The Transforming World', to strengthen the geographical concept of change that runs through Stage 2, and to reflect the link between people and the physical environment.
  • The title of Topic 1 has been amended to 'Ecosystems and People', and additional exemplification of the human impact on ecosystems included.
  • Students extending their ethical understanding through working with people and preserving places and environments has been added to 'Fieldwork'.
  • Students provide evidence of their learning through six (not seven) assessments, and complete four (not five) geographical skills and applications tasks.Additional specifications have also been included, clarifying which topics the tasks cover.
  • Reference to 21st Century has been removed from KU2 and 'contemporary' added to case studies to ensure that case studies are not historic.

Exemplars are being developed for inclusion in implementation workshops and web publication that highlight in particular those aspects of the curriculum that are innovative and herald changes in learning and assessment practices. These will include, for example, innovative approaches to local fieldwork.

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